India Can Bring Down CO2 Emissions from Coal-Based Power Sector by 22%: CSE

India’s coal-based thermal power sector is one of the country’s biggest emitters of CO2. It spews out 1.1 gigatonne of CO2 every year – this is 2.5 per cent of global GHG emissions, one-third of India’s GHG emissions, and around 50 per cent of India’s fuel-related CO2 emissions.

December 15, 2020. By Manu Tayal

We need policies for decarbonizing coal power. If these get implemented, CO2 emissions from the coal power sector can be reduced by up to 22 per cent in comparison to a business-as-usual scenario, suggested Nivit K Yadav, programme director, industrial pollution unit, Centre for Science and Environment (CSE).

He was speaking during a webinar on ‘Reducing CO2 footprints of India’s coal-based power sector’.

India’s coal-based thermal power sector is one of the country’s biggest emitters of CO2. It spews out 1.1 gigatonne of CO2 every year – this is 2.5 per cent of global GHG emissions, one-third of India’s GHG emissions, and around 50 per cent of India’s fuel-related CO2 emissions.

“Obviously, the coal-based power sector is bad news for India that is claiming to lead the world in emissions reduction,” adds Nivit K Yadav. “But the fact is that we cannot do away with coal so quickly. India’s growing energy needs means coal is here to stay for at least this decade. Even in 2030, coal will contribute around 50 per cent of the electricity generation mix. How, then, can the country move ahead on a path where it can use coal efficiently to reduce its share of GHG emissions? Our new analysis -- Reducing CO2 footprints of India’s coal-based power sector, puts forth a few feasible measures.”

The CSE analysis points out that India’s targets in its INDCs (intended nationally determined contributions) mostly focus on an ambitious deployment of renewable power. Yadav said “this is not enough. We believe the coal-based power sector needs to take major initiatives if India wants to reduce its GHG emission. Similar ambitious plans are needed in this sector as well.”

CSE in its analysis suggested to - Improve fleet technology and efficiency, renovate and modernize; Plan for the old capacity; Propagate biomass co-firing; Invest in carbon capture and storage (CCS); and Bring back coal beneficiation.

The CSE analysis also recommended that India should use both carbon tax and carbon trading system effectively to push for decarbonisation in the coal sector. Says Vinay Trivedi “as per global experience, an efficient trading mechanism takes years to mature and yield results on the field – but India seems to have no plans for carbon trading as of now.”

Speaking about CSE’s standpoint on coal, director general Sunita Narain clarifies that “we need an energy transformation through which we would realize the co-benefits of local and global emission reduction. We also need the right to energy for all, as energy poverty and inequity is not acceptable. At the same time, we recognise the fact that coal is still very much a part of India’s power needs.”

Please share! Email Buffer Digg Facebook Google LinkedIn Pinterest Reddit Twitter
If you want to cooperate with us and would like to reuse some of our content,
please contact: contact@energetica-india.net.
 
 
 
Next events

 

Last interview
 
 
Privacy Policy (PDF) / Terms and conditions (PDF)
 Energetica India is a publication from Editorial Omnimedia. No reproduction in whole or part of content posted on this website.