HomeEnergy Storage ›Harvard Engineers Develop Lithium Metal Battery with 6,000+ Charge Cycles

Harvard Engineers Develop Lithium Metal Battery with 6,000+ Charge Cycles

Overcoming a major challenge of dendrite formation on the anode surface, the researchers employed micron-sized silicon particles to constrict the lithiation reaction.

January 17, 2024. By Abha Rustagi

Researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences have unveiled a groundbreaking lithium metal battery capable of at least 6,000 charge-discharge cycles, surpassing all other pouch battery cells. 

This innovation, published in Nature Materials, not only introduces a new method for solid-state batteries with a lithium metal anode but also enhances understanding of materials crucial for these potentially transformative batteries.

“Lithium metal anode batteries are considered the holy grail of batteries because they have ten times the capacity of commercial graphite anodes and could drastically increase the driving distance of electric vehicles,” said Xin Li, Associate Professor of Materials Science at SEAS and senior author of the paper. “Our research is an important step toward more practical solid-state batteries for industrial and commercial applications.” 

Overcoming a major challenge of dendrite formation on the anode surface, the researchers employed micron-sized silicon particles to constrict the lithiation reaction, preventing dendrite growth and enabling homogeneous plating of a thick layer of lithium metal.

In this innovative design, lithium metal wraps around the silicon particle, akin to a hard chocolate shell around a hazelnut core in a chocolate truffle. The resulting homogenous surface curtails dendrite growth, and the battery can recharge in just 10 minutes due to quick plating and stripping on an even surface. 

The postage stamp-sized pouch cell version retained 80 percent capacity after 6,000 cycles, outperforming existing pouch cell batteries.

The technology has been licensed to Adden Energy, a Harvard spinoff, which plans to scale up the battery to a smartphone-sized pouch cell. The researchers also identified other materials with similar potential, paving the way for further advancements in battery design.
Please share! Email Buffer Digg Facebook Google LinkedIn Pinterest Reddit Twitter
If you want to cooperate with us and would like to reuse some of our content,
please contact: contact@energetica-india.net.
 
 
Next events
 
 
Last interviews
 
Follow us