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energetica-india-57_asiapowerweek

ENERGETICA INDIA RENEWABLE ENERGY Battery Storage for Renewables For over a century, energy storage in the power sector has been dominated by one technology – pumped hydropower storage. Along with the rest of the sector, that is beginning to change. Renewable energy deployment and policies to modernise electricity production and consumption are propelling numerous advances, including increased battery storage. This technology stores energy chemically and can be located at the point of demand or at the grid level. Its use can allow for greater amounts of renewable electricity and contribute to system reliability. Renewable energy deployment in the electricity sector is catalysing efforts to modernise the electricity grid, including the increased implementation of battery storage. Driven by policy and technological progress, renewable energy has been installed at unprecedented rates in recent years. This is particularly true of variable renewable energy like wind and solar PV. They both present the fastest growth of all types of renewable energy. The growth in variable renewable energy is expected to continue. The International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) global renewable energy road map analysed the possibility of doubling the global share of renewable energy by 2030. Unlike traditional fossil fuel plants and some forms of renewable electricity production (i.e. biomass, pumped hydropower and geothermal), the wind and the sun provide power only when the renewable resource is available. This makes them less predictable. Variability in electricity supply must be accounted for to maximise renewable energy penetration into the electricity system and ensures a match between electricity supply and demand at all times. Modularity is another characteristic of some renewable energy types, especially PV and wind. This means incremental capacity can be easily added and may be deployed at the site of electricity demand. These ‘behind the meter’ or distributed generation installations range from small kilowatt (kW) sized installations to megawatt (MW)-scale industrial projects. They are put on a roof (typical of household applications) or next to a commercial or industrial facility. Distributed generation upends the traditional model, which is to connect large power generation facilities to demand centres over large distances. The variable and decentralised nature of renewable energy deployment presents unique challenges to maximise and ensure reliable electricity supply. At high levels of penetration, increased electricity production fluctuations may increase the risk to reliable supply of electricity. This is because supply and demand of electricity must be balanced at all times. The definition of high penetration varies among electricity energetica INDIA · MAY | JUN16 49


energetica-india-57_asiapowerweek
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