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The impetus of Indian government on unconventional energy has given a boost to projects focused on generation of green and clean energy. Due to variable generation of solar power during a day, maintaining grid stability is a major challenge. Storage of solar energy in a cost effective manner is another challenge. Availability of land for setting up solar plants helps in speedy commissioning of solar projects. Government has rightly consolidated the land for solar parks and has given them to developers in recently concluded NTPC reverse auction for plants in Rajasthan and Andhra Pradesh. ENERGETICA INDIA: What is your opinion on solar projects under Open Access in India? ANJALI RATTAN NASHIER: Open access is currently in the nascent stages and will require critical reforms to have a robust regulatory framework. Distribution companies show reluctance in processing open access applications. Grid availability, policy support and availability of on-site space are key elements based on which end users can decide for open access. Although interstate transmission charges have been waived off for solar power but still intrastate transmission charges vary from state to state. Grid availability and non uniform policies are two major impediments that need to be addresses for expansion of open access. Currently most of the open access projects are located in few states like Rajasthan because of favourable regulatory environment but a robust policy framework will bring more clarity on various costs involved with these projects in the long term which will make them more bankable. Thus, a strong uniform regulatory framework is required for success of open access and rooftop solar is definitely going to be an important component in such solar projects. ENERGETICA INDIA: Do you think India has reached its low in solar tariffs or is there scope of further decrease in solar tariffs? Or will we see the tariffs see a reverse trend? ANJALI RATTAN NASHIER: With volatile markets and technological advancements, it is very difficult to predict anything regarding solar tariffs. Value of rupee and technological advancements in solar technology are going to play an important role in deciding future solar tariffs. ENERGETICA INDIA: How are “local content” requirements impacting the market development? ANJALI RATTAN NASHIER: Indian manufacturing capacity of solar modules is currently approximately 2800 MW. Though imposition of ‘local content’ requirements has helped the existing manufacturers but it still accounts for less than 5% of overall demand in the Indian solar market. There have been demands for imposing anti-dumping duties on solar cells and modules. Many international solar manufacturers like JA Solar and Trina are setting up manufacturing facilities in India which is an indication that international suppliers now view Indian demand to be reliable enough to make substantial local investments. We hope that the gap in demand and supply will be bridged in due course of time leading to a healthy competition in the market. ENERGETICA INDIA: Is RattanIndia also looking at investments in other renewable energy technologies, such as wind, hydro and biomass? ANJALI RATTAN NASHIER: We are open to new proposals and evaluate the risks and returns for each project. We will continue to explore opportunities in renewable energy SOLAR POWER 26 energetica INDIA · MAR | APR16


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