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RENEWABLE ENERGY MR. SANDEEP GOSWAMI COO, FOUNTAINHEAD II CLEANTECH INDIA Application of Ideas; Is India ready? Unless we start to think of innovations and utilize the Reuse & Recycle policy, we will be seriously challenged in the near future. Some of the renewable energy concepts/ideas that I came across recently and the ones that India can look at: India can have airborne wind turbines off-shore and near the Indian sea ports, tethered to old ships which otherwise are sent to the scrap yards. Many of the oil tankers can be used to make floating power stations which can be equipped with a combination of wind turbines and Solar PV, (CSP?). These installations will provide enough power to be utilized by the docked ships as auxiliary power thus saving a lot of fossil fuel from burning and creating more GHG. Authorities in Japan and some global companies already adapting the idea into their operational ships. If we truly want to use the wind-solar hybrid and also make a sustainable business out of it, we must allow the long coast line of India to dock off-shore ships or barges which are at their end of life and use them as floating platforms to generate power. This would not only help India but one or few more contentious issue can also to some extent be solved by utilizing the ships. For example the empty hulls can be modified to become softdrink factories, where they are privately owned and they create their huge requirement of water right from the sea utilizing the solar for desalination. We all know that a commercial airliner flies at a minimum speed of 875KM/ hour which is around 543Miles/ hour. A turbine which generates say 10KW requires a wind speed of 25 Mph. So one can hopefully do the mathematics of what a 543mph wind speed can generate. Air-plane wings typically have two jet engines and the jumbo have 4. If we can replace or modify the jet engine into a hybrid system which can generate power both when the turbine is fired to rotate via use of a combustion engine or simply utilizing the very high rotation, which would come with the spinning of the blades at such high-speed, to charge up the dynamos which could at-least provide with auxiliary power during cruise speed. The image shows a wind turbine named “Ram Air Turbines”. It more or less works as an emergency power backup during landing and essentially used in small planes for opening their landing gear. The idea is not new and the technology is also understood. But no commercial jet aircraft can have small turbines protruding out of its fuselage, the drag would be enormous. But adapting it, what we Indians call “Jugaad” is another thing. And I must humbly request the government to consider it as an idea which our scientist must explore. SANJITH. S. SHETTY VICE CHAIRMAN & MANAGING DIRECTOR, SOHAM RENEWABLE ENERGY INDIA PVT. LTD The hot points of COP21 The draft is filed keeping in mind the needs of developing nations and respects the obligations to human rights by taking actions addressing climate change without discriminating any minority, race and gender. At the heart of the latest draft text are the statements of overall intent and purpose. The agreement sets its over arching goal as to hold the increase in the global average temperature to well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels and pursuing efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5°C. It also sets an aim for countries to reach the peaking of greenhouse house gas emissions as soon as possible, recognizing that peaking will take longer for developing country Parties, and to undertake rapid reductions thereafter towards reaching greenhouse gas emissions neutrality in the second half of the century. These are not, of course, as forceful or as rapid as many would like to see, but they represent profound shifts from any global agreement we have ever seen in the past. Biggest battles at COP21 have been the goal of how much we let our planet heat up. Vulnerable countries fought hard for the goal of 1.5°C. Much is owed to island nations and climate justice groups. Whether it’s 2 or 1.5C - what’s clear is we have to move to get off of fossil fuels fast. Though there were several pledges to cut emissions there’s a huge amount of work to be done. A long term goal to get off fossil fuels was set at 2050 as the goal for when the world would be 100% off of fossil fuels. One of the good things about this agreement is the 5 year review mechanism. Right now the contributions from each country will not bring us a safe world, not even close. But now this agreement would force countries to come back to the table every five years to review their emissions reduction targets and make new, more ambitious cuts For the first time in history, the whole world has made a public commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and deal with the impacts of climate change. Although different countries will move at different speeds, the transition to a low carbon world is now inevitable. It is good to see the era of politicians burying their heads in the sand is over and new dawn of climate-aware politics. 72 energetica INDIA · JAN | FEB16


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