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SHARAD SAXENA CHIEF INNOVATION OFFICER, DEVELOPMENT ALTERNATIVES (DA) Improvement in transmission and storage must to fulfil the increasing demand of energy services In order to improve the quality of life and fulfil basic needs there is going to be a steady increase in demand for power. For this we need to add to the capacities to generate more power, and improve efficiency of transmission and storage While the GDP has been in the range of 6%-8 % the primary energy demand in India has grown from about 450 million toe toe= tonnes of oil equivalent in 2000 to about 770 million toe in 2012 and is expected to increase to about 1250 (estimated by International Energy Agency) to 1500 (estimated in the Integrated Energy Policy Report) million toe in 2030. This is mainly due to increasing incomes and economic growth which lead to greater demand for energy services such as lighting, cooking, space cooling, mobility, industrial production, office automation, etc. At this point of time we need to keep in mind that ( current very low level of energy supply in India) the average annual energy supply in India in 2011 was only 0.6 toe per capita; whereas the global average was 1.88 toe per capita. India is ranking on the HDI, abysmally low # 135 in world ranking. It may also be noted that no country in the world has been able to achieve a Human Development Index of 0.9 or more without an annual energy supply of at least 4 tonne per capita. In order to improve the quality of life and fulfil basic needs there is going to be a steady increase in demand. While on one hand there is a need to add to the capacities to generate more power, we have to also battle with dropping thermal efficiencies of our thermal power plants due to aging factor. There is a limitation to which we can improve the efficiencies of these plants as the challenge is that the Indian power sector suffers from limited supply and poor quality of coal. On account of low levels of technological advancement, the Indian power plants emit 0.94 kg CO2 per kWh produced, which is approximately 50% higher than the world average. On the generation side, government is also promoting greater use of renewable in the energy mix mainly through solar and wind and at the same time shifting towards supercritical technologies for coal based power plants. The second side is the supply chain which also is saddled with losses (T&D losses being more than 20%). By using more intelligent and response orientated systems including Smart Grid, (used both by Public Sectors as well as Private sector) government intends to bring down these losses in check. However, the key lies on managing the demand side of power more intelligently. The Energy Conservation Act (EC Act) was enacted in 2001 with the goal of reducing energy intensity of Indian economy. Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) was set up as the statutory body on 1st March 2002 at the central level to facilitate the implementation of the EC Act. The Act provides regulatory mandate for: standards & labelling of equipment and appliances; energy conservation building codes for commercial buildings; and energy consumption norms for energy intensive industries. In addition, the Act enjoins the Central Govt. and the Bureau to take steps to facilitate and promote energy efficiency in all sectors of the economy. It also directs states to designate agencies for the implementation of the Act and promotion of energy efficiency in the state. The EC Act was amended in 2010 and the main amendments of the Act are: • The Central Government may issue the energy savings certificate to the designated consumer whose energy consumption is less than the prescribed norms and standards in accordance with the procedure as may be prescribed • The designated consumer whose energy consumption is more than the prescribed norms and standards shall be entitled to purchase the energy savings certificate to comply with the prescribed norms and standards • The Central Government may, in consultation with the Bureau, prescribe the value of per metric ton of oil equivalent of energy consumed • Commercial buildings which are having a connected load of 100 kW or contract demand of 120 kVA and above come under the purview of ECBC under EC Act Ministry of Power, through Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE), has initiated a number of energy efficiency initiatives in the areas of household lighting, commercial buildings, standards and labeling of appliances, demand side management in agriculture/municipalities, SME’s and large industries including the initiation of the process for development of energy consumption norms for industrial sub sectors, capacity building of SDA’s etc. The target of energy savings against these schemes during the XI plan period was kept 10,000 ENERGY EFFICIENCY 42 energética INDIA · JAN | FEB16


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