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KARNATAKA Targeting Established • Karnataka has about 240-300 sunny days in a year with an estimated solar potential of 24.7 GWp (as per NISE). • Also, as per NIWE’s estimation, the state has fourth highest installable wind potential of 13593 MW at 80m height in India. • Significant achievement in installation of RE capacity of 4749MW which is 15% of country's RE installed capacity. • The solar policy of the state aims to add 1600 MW of grid connected utility scale solar power projects by 2021 and 400 • MW of grid connected roof-top projects by 2018. However, the present installed solar capacity is only 84 MW. • RE capacity addition of 18.5% annually is required to meet the target of 14817MW set by MNRE. Efficiency Established • Karnataka RE Policy 2009-14 (which is the wind power policy) was launched in 2010 and was valid up to five years till 2014. Since the operative period of the existing policy is over, there is no clarity on the state’s wind capacity addition plan. • State’s solar capacity addition target of 2000MW by 2021under the solar policy is not in line with the target of 5697 MW solar capacity addition committed by the state to MNRE. • Solar generators are exempted from payment of wheeling, banking and cross subsidy surcharge for a period of ten years from the date of commissioning. • For RE development, KREDL subleases the land to developers for a period of 30 years. • Solar power developers are allowed to use agricultural land also. Coordination Developing • Karnataka revised its solar policy in 2014 before the expiration of the old policy to aggressively aim for higher targets. • Trajectory of RPO targets for the state is not defined in the long term. The regulation does not specify the year till which the current RPO targets are applicable. Also it does not specify the change (increase) in RPO targets in the future. This also discourages developers to invest in RE development in the state Implementation Established • Installed hydro capacity might not be sufficient to balance the future growth in RE and conventional plants would have to be required for balancing. • Though the state is aggressively allocating funds for developing conventional plants, coal linkages and gas availability form the major bottleneck. • KPTCL’s major concern is the acquisition of land for the establishment of sub-stations and procuring right of way for drawing transmission lines within the state. RENEWABLE ENERGY 42 energetica INDIA · NOV | DEC15


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