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TAMIL NADU RENEWABLE ENERGY Targeting Established • Without a comprehensive wind policy, with no targets set, without roadmap/plan for target achievement with a definite control period; state has added 7600MW of wind capacity as on 2015. Increased deployment of wind capacities were due to good wind resources, accelerated depreciation benefits and GBI schemes. • As per Solar Policy 2012, state was supposed to add 3000MW by 2015. However, current achievement is only 119.06MW as on 2015. • Untapped wind potential (80m Hub) is 14152 MW (as per • NIWE 2010), however the state as per its commitment to MNRE is adding around 4300MW by 2022 in order to achieve a cumulative wind target of 11900MW by 2022. • Untapped Solar potential in State 17.67 GW (as per NISE 2014), state has committed to MNRE a cumulative target achievement of 8884MW in solar by 2022. • As per Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory reports 2012 • and as per studies conducted by MNRE, the state has abundant off shore potential (more than 100GW, which is still under validation). This potential should be tapped by defining an off shore wind policy with suitable schemes, measures and targets. • The CAGR required for achieving the state RE target for 2022 is 14.4%. This is higher in comparison to the state CAGR of RE capacity addition since 2011 which are around 8%- 9%. • 2022 targeted RE capacity, 21508MW as per MNRE is nearly 72% of the peak demand (29975MW) for 2022. Currently the state ongoing/proposed conventional power projects are more than 7712MW as per state energy policy note 2014-15. This depicts an alarming situation for the state to build an efficient market mechanism in order export its excess generation from the state. Since technical limits of conventional have a threshold and also it is a threat to grid security. Efficiency Established • State energy sector in its Vision 2023, has clearly represented its tentative investment plans(public and private) of INR 4, 50,000 in order in order to build enormous non - conventional, conventional and T&D infrastructure development. State does not have suitable incentive • /schemes to promote PPP investment schemes for building transmission infrastructure for renewable energy. • State needs to repower old WEG or WEG with low PLF. • Required policy actions are absent currently. • Solar Policy 2012 has a control period for only 3 years. Policy amendment with clear action plan is awaited for the state to increase its capacity from 119MW currently installed to 8884MW by 2022. • States’ performance in solar power development has met lot of Challenges. The government underwent a tender process for 1000MW to award projects, however it received bids only for 500MW.and also issued letter of intent for 226MW to developers. However, it was later scrapped in 2014. Later the state, came up with attractive FiT under which project were awarded under first come first serve basis instead of bidding. This too has complications as FiT scheme is applicable for new projects commissioned before Sep 2015. Around 30MW was signed and ready to be commissioned as of Feb 2015. • State has still not charted a roadmap/action plan for this wind target achievement. A wind policy with defined targets, plan of actions and definite control period is absent. • Letters of intent has been issued by TANGEDCO to establish solar power plants of 708 MW capacities to fifty two private developers as per State Energy Policy note 2014-15. • State initiatives to promote rooftop schemes such CM rooftop schemes, CM’s solar power Greenhouse scheme displays the states’ intent to propagate solar mission amongst the consumers. However, in order to achieve targets of 2022, proportion of the deployment capacity in the state between large scale and rooftop scale is still unclear. • State successfully launched the net metering policy in 2014. • State’s solar purchase obligation of 6% has been challenged by certain consumers association in the state. • State tariff policy offers a return of equity of 20% (pre-tax) for solar and 19.85% (pre-tax) for wind. However, analysis of wind tariff for developers depicts that the group captive + REC route provides developers with 65% more revenue than FIT. However, apart for group captive, the developers are willing to avail preferential tariff due to its long term clarity and fixed return of investment. Coordination Established • State has installed only 15MW in JNSSM; however the national mission success enabled to develop the state solar policy 2012. TN Solar policy committed higher capacities of deployment, nearly much aligned with earlier JNNSM capacities (20000MW) for 2020. However, JNNSM target capacities for 2022 have increased significantly; the state solar policy needs a revision with clear action plans/measures and schemes. • State has not clearly defined deployment capacities that will undergo competitive bidding and defined deployment • Capacities that will be offered FiT. • The state has 13.43% of RE capacity used for power generation however RPO target of only 9% after downward revision in 2011. • There is no clear RPO trajectory post 2015. • As per Energy policy note 2014-15, the state has proposed to build transmission schemes for augmenting network for evacuation of wind power and solar power at a total cost of Rs. 1,600 crores with the assistance of NCEF, kWp loan and owned infused equity. Implementation Established • Managing “Must run status” for wind power during high wind season is difficult due to the season coinciding with low demand season, limited threshold for technical back down of conventional plants and thus challenging grid stability. • Managing high RE variability especially wind power within the state is causing increased balancing cost. • Only 400MW of pump hydro balancing potential available, hence the grid operators are representing to the centre and state to bring efficient market mechanism. • There is fund requirement for building pumped storages such as Kundah and Kadamparai. • Huge transmission constraints observed and the state is in a nascent stage for building HVDC lines for evacuating RE power. Transmission planning is not in line with RE capacity addition 40 energetica INDIA · NOV | DEC15


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