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Energética India | September / October 2015

concern on environmental challenges have added to the urgency of finding a sustainable, high-growth, low carbon economic model. The design of a sustainable smart grid model can also provide a blueprint for developing nations across the world. Practical Application Demonstrated The smart grid is not a simple formula or template. It is as much a vision as a blueprint. In its broadest interpretation, the smart grid vision sees the electric supply industry actually transformed by the introduction of two-way communications and ubiquitous metering and measurement. It enables much finer control of energy flows to the end user integrating the processes that have not been practicable to date. It also creates more reliable, more robust and more secure electrical infrastructure. Smart Grid Technology - Technological Advantages Access to clean and green energy for the rural market has been at the forefront for the Development Alternatives (DA) group and its social enterprise wing – TARA. TARAurja was formally operationalised in 2013 as an operational business unit, incubated within TARA for the deployment and management of renewable energy based mini-grids. TARAurja now known as TMPL has in the last few months ramped up operations across Bihar and UP. The team has set up a total of 21 micro-grids across these two states and is currently servicing more than 1,500 consumers. TMPL has developed intelligent hardware devices and software that allow it to monitor and control electricity in individual households remotely through cloud technology. This helps by ensuring timely revenue collection and in the prevention POWER SECTOR Ensuring Access to Affordable, Sustainable and Modern Energy for All of theft of electricity along the distribution line. TMPL’s target segment are people who require reliable power for Time-of-Use (TOU). TMPL has thus impacted lives of the consumers, who are benefitting from the consumption of power at much economical rates. The beneficiaries now have access to guaranteed power for a minimum number of hours per day. This has enabled shopkeepers to have longer operation hours and households are at last self-reliant and no longer need to burn midnight kerosene oil. In addition to the immediate savings for households in terms of kerosene bills and other power backup options, they are no longer subjected to harmful fumes produced from burning kerosene. TMPL visualises having 300 such minigrids up and running by the end of 2018 with an average annual revenue of INR 274,000,000 (or $4.5 Million). These mini grids will be servicing an anticipated 60,000 consumers through a network of franchised operators The provision of modern energy services is a huge concern globally. Over 1.2 billion people living in the developing world and constituting around 20% of the world’s population are still struggling for electricity access. Nearly 3 billion people use wood, coal, charcoal or animal dung to cook their meals and heat their homes and nearly 2 million die every year due to respiratory disorders caused by exposure to indoor pollution from traditional cook stoves. While nonelectrified rural households are dependent on kerosene for their lighting needs, those that have been connected to the grid also often depend on kerosene due to non-availability of electricity. It is estimated that by 2030, 3 billion people in the world will move into the rising middle class segment, which will increase the demand for energy by almost 50%. The key solution to these challenges lies in providing sustainable energy, which is not only affordable and reliable, but also modern. With sustainable energy, countries can leapfrog over the limits of the energy systems of the past and build clean energy economies for the future. For achieving sustainable energy for all, the following four parameters have to be met: affordability, reliability, sustainability and use of high-technology. These four components in the right mix are essential for producing a long term solution that addresses the energy needs of the unserved masses. Currently, innovation in solar lighting has provided a standalone solar home lighting system that has a low initial cost. Technological advancement in pelletisation of agrowaste could also lead to a reliable and long term solution to meeting energy needs in a sustainable manner. Another interesting intervention that is waiting to happen is the techno commercial solution allowing the existing lakhs of Diesel Generator Operators to readily adopt renewable energy based solutions like solar. Sustainable development without energy is inconceivable. Hence, the need is to provide real access, while focusing on equitable pattern of consumption. Lastly, modern energy services are crucial to human well-being and to a country’s economic development. Access to energy is essential for the provision of not only clean water, sanitation and healthcare but also reliable and efficient lighting, cooking and heating. TARA, the social enterprise wing of the Development Alternatives Group is attempting to find a solution that would be attractive to a Diesel Generator Operator to convert from diesel based generation to solar based generation. One major component is efficient use of the energy that is generated. To optimise this, currently under the final stages of development is a load management and cloud based revenue management system that allows energy that is actually generated to be used both efficiently and be accounted for by the billing system. It is being planned to deploy this system at various micro grid sites across Uttar Pradesh and Bihar. TARA, along with its network partners is committed towards carving a better world by implementing innovative projects and business models to ensure energy access for all. 79 energetica INDIA · SEP | OCT15


Energética India | September / October 2015
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